Prior Action Alerts and...

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Posted
May 05, 2006

The most recent meeting of the Coalition for Action on the Remediation of Dioxane (CARD) took place in February. The group will be setting a regular cycle of meetings, beginning with a full meeting scheduled for April 26, 2006 at 6:30 p.m. It was determined that a consistent schedule for meetings may aid increased participation. The location will be the MSU Extension Room in the lower level at 705 N. Zeeb Rd. (The first large meeting in December was at this location.)

One of the first initiatives being undertaken is the development of a fact sheet by the county representatives, with MDEQ”S input, defining the “Prohibition Zone” and the responsibilities for residents living within its boundaries. The fact sheet addresses issues for realtors, builders, and contractors, as well as homeowners. It may include a template for the disclosure requirements when selling a home.

Another initiative deals with the creation of a guide covering some areas of concern for residents when confronted with the prospect of having a well drilled on or near one’s property (i.e. liability coverage). This may be based in part on the information the city uses in such situations. Further, attaining information on prospective drilling sites earlier in the process is a goal for the group. (Included are some photos of a recent drilling.)

The county representatives made a commitment to follow-up on the status of the resolution passed months ago by the Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners and to solicit MDEQ’s definition of the current boundaries of the Prohibition Zone, which will need periodic updates as the plume migrates.

PON feels that these are a good starting point for CARD, by focusing on practical applications for the public utilizing the expertise/resources of the group. However, we again urge participation by as many citizens as possible.

The goal of the group, ostensibly, has been to include and maximize citizen input in all facets ofthis process. Without it, the focus may become diffuse and merely yet another governmental committee.

Hope to see you there.

Thank you,

Mike, Chris and Jeff

Protect Our Neighborhoods

Posted March 05, 2006

As related in our last update, a meeting took place to further organize and discuss the Coalition for the Remediation of Dioxane, on February 21st, 2006 at the Scio Township Hall.

Due to a less than hoped-for turnout of new participants, the meeting did not address the organizational structure of CARD in any detail. The issue was tabled to the next meeting. However, out of the meeting came the resolution to be submitted to the Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners and a cover memo to them, as well (attached).

The new meeting, is Wednesday, March 8, from 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. at the Western Service Center of the County offices at 705 N. Zeeb Rd.

Again, this organization is being proposed in order to elicit more citizen participation. We need more citizens. Only two new people attended the last meeting. This is our opportunity to help shape/affect the goals this group pursues with respect to the remediation of the dioxane contamination. This group, with the anticipated support of the county, city, and surrounding townships will carry weight and will pursue action at the state level, as well as educate the public. All groups have acknowledged that the participation of citizens in the past has contributed to whatever positive outcomes that have been achieved.

At the same time, we, as citizens, need to ensure our interests are incorporated into these efforts. One of the “resolves” in the Board resolution, you will note, is that the group will ensure citizen participation in every group, committee, and subcommittee of CARD.

This venture is not without risk, and only we, as citizens can and must take the responsibility to be sure that our viewpoint is assertively represented and reflected in the outcomes of this group.

Please, seriously consider participating in this group. Please come to this meeting, Wednesday March 8 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the County Western Services Center at 705 N. Zeeb Rd. You are needed!

And please pass this information to others who might be interested.

As always, many thanks-

Mike, Chris, Jeff

Protect Our Neighborhoods

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR
220 NORTH MAIN STREET, P.O. BOX 8645
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 48107-8645
(734)222-6850
FAX (734)222-6715

TO:

Wesley Prater, Chair
Board of Commissioners

 

 

THROUGH:

Robert E. Guenzel
County Administrator

 

 

FROM:

Richard M. Fleece Environmental Services Director
Department of Planning and Environment

 

 

DATE:

March 15,2006

 

 

SUBJECT:

Requesting endorsement of a citizen/government coalition: Coalition for Action on Remediation of Dioxane; to appoint a county commissioner to participate on that coalition; and to conclude its participation in the IPC

BOARD ACTION REQUESTED:

Washtenaw County Planning and Environment is requesting the Board of Commissioners endorse the formation of the Coalition for Action on Remediation of Dioxane (CARD), appointing a County Commissioner as its representative and conclude it’s participation in the Gelman Groundwater Remediation plan Intergovernmental Partnership (IPC).  

BACKGROUND:

1, 4-Dioxane contamination from Gelman Science persists after nearly 20 years of cleanup activities and has now spread to an area over three miles long and a mile wide.  Recent events including a leaking pipeline, a change in treatment technology that will result in a carcinogenic by-product being discharged and the imposition of a “Prohibition Zone” that prevents the use of wells and bans permitting new wells within that zone and requires notification to potential buyers when a property transfer occurs, have heightened concern among citizens governments and others over the effectiveness of the ongoing remediation plan.  The Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners has since the 1990s taken an active role in cooperation with others in authorizing actions to safeguard its citizens and the environment from that contamination.  Reference BOC Resolutions 96-0278, 98-0036, 98-202, 99-106, 03-0236, 04-0102 and 05-0139.
Discussions among concerned parties has resulted in the formation of a coalition (CARD) with the intention of broadening participation, increasing awareness of the issues, and taking actions to assure effective remediation strategies are employed.

DISCUSSION:

The Gelman Science 1, 4-dioxane contamination is an issue that remains a long term concern for citizens and governments in Washtenaw County.  The contamination originally limited to an area in Scio Township, persists there and is spreading.  A large segment of the contamination is projected to eventually migrate to the Huron River downstream from the intake of the Ann Arbor Water Treatment Plant but that outcome is in no way assured.  Since the contamination was first discovered in the mid 1980’s disagreements over the best means to remediate the problem have occurred.  Washtenaw County Government has taken an active role by entering in legal proceedings, providing staff and resources, maintaining a repository of information on the subject and participating in groups and forums aimed at assuring the Best Available Technology is utilized and the remediation is performed in the most effective non-intrusive manner.

Recent events have led to the formation of a new coalition – CARD, this groups aim is to gain wide spread participation from the governments that are currently directly effected by this contamination and those that are likely to be affected, and by groups and individuals who are concerned with this issue.  This resolution would endorse that group, provide resources, and appoint a county commissioner to participate in the activities of the group,

IMPACT ON HUMAN RESOURCES:

Limited; continued support by existing staff, assistance will be needed to develop a web site for the coalition.

IMPACT ON BUDGET:

 None

IMPACT ON OTHER COUNTY DEPARTMENTS OR OUTSIDE AGENCIES:

The Drain Commissioner is a participant in the coalition.
Support Services will provide assistance in establishing a website.

CONFORMITY TO COUNTY POLICIES:

The request is consistent with past resolutions regarding 1, 4-dioxane contamination by Gelman/Pall Life Sciences.

ATTACHMENTS/APPENDICES:

None

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

A RESOLUTION ENDORSING FORMATION OF THE COALITION FOR ACTION ON REMEDIATION OF DIOXANE (CARD), APPOINTING A WASHTENAW COUNTY COMMISSIONER AS ITS REPRESENTATIVE AND CONCLUDING ITS PARTICIPATION IN THE GELMAN GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION PLAN INTERGOVERNMENTAL PARTNERSHIP.

WASHTENAW COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS

March 15, 2006

WHEREAS, the PALL/Gelman contamination site continues to demand attention and actions from the State, County and impacted local units of Government including the City of Ann Arbor, Scio Township, and Ann Arbor Township;

WHEREAS, through cooperative efforts local governments and citizens have instrumental in achieving much of the positive progress that has been made to date;

WHEREAS, the Intergovernmental Partnership Committee created in August 1997 served the residents of Washtenaw County well in coordinating policies and strategies across local units of government, but lacked sufficient mechanisms for citizen involvement and is no longer active;

WHEREAS, an organization is needed to replace the existing Gelman Groundwater Remediation Plan Intergovernmental Partnership to better meet the community needs;

WHEREAS, 1,4-dioxane released by PALL/Gelman persists and groundwater contamination has expanded in Washtenaw County to an area over three miles long and one mile wide;

WHEREAS, the remediation of this site is likely to take an additional 20 years or more based on Pall Corp. and MDEQ estimates;

WHEREAS, activities continue that require monitoring and response by governmental organizations in coordination with citizens, including but not limited to actions related to permits, well installations, remediation technologies, effluent discharge, contamination migration, pipe installation and maintenance;

WHEREAS, the Court Cases and recent court decisions impact multiple jurisdictions and thereby require a strong organization to coordinate actions regarding education, political, legal, technical and policy;

WHEREAS, citizens, staff and elected officials from the State, County, City of Ann Arbor and impacted townships, including the Drain Commissioner, City of Ann Arbor Environmental Coordinator, County Commissioner, County staff, MDEQ staff, township supervisors, citizens representing various groups, met and agreed that a citizen and government coalition would be of substantial benefit;

 

WHEREAS, this organization is intended to include elected representatives, key staff, environmental organizations, neighborhood groups, all interested citizens, and MDEQ;

WHEREAS, the County encourages from other governmental agencies that are now or may become affected, to participate in this endeavor;

WHEREAS, the County encourages preparation of agendas with expected outcomes to ensure efficient participation from members and shall seek consensus among parties;

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, the Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners hereby endorses the creation of the Coalition for Action on Remediation of Dioxane (CARD);

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, this organization shall include citizen representation on all levels, groups, committees and subcommittees;

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, this organization shall create goals and committees as needed to ensure that education, technical, political, legal, and policy goals are met;

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, Washtenaw County shall support this organization with appropriate staff and necessary resources;

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners approves the following appointment to this coalition:

            Conan Smith, Washtenaw County Commissioner

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners hereby concludes participation in the Gelman Groundwater Remediation Plan Intergovernmental Partnership;

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, the Washtenaw County Clerk shall forward copies of this resolution to Ann Arbor Township, Scio Township, City of Ann Arbor, the MDEQ, and locally elected state officials.

Posted February 17, 2006

In the summer of 2005, staff members from Washtenaw County departments were preparing to approach the County Board of Commissioners to pass a resolution asking MDEQ to appeal Judge Shelton’s ruling on the dioxane remediation. PON, SRSW, and other groups met with Conan Smith and county staffers to amend the resolution so that it would not lead to the reopening of that ruling and put neighborhood pipelines back on the table.

One offshoot of that process, due to the constructive input from citizens to assist with the above resolution, was an agreed interest in creating a group similar to the Intergovernmental Partnership Committee (IPC) formed in 1997, the Citizens Review Committee (CRC), and the Citizens Advisory Committee. Those groups do not currently function and the intent is for the new group to exist for the life of the clean-up, which consensus estimates it will take 20-50 years to complete. A definite difference would be the integral participation of citizens in a new group. As PON has noted in the past, much of the best insight on the dioxane issue has come from citizens.

This new group—the Coalition for the Remediation of Dioxane (CARD) is expected to comprise representation from citizens, neighborhood groups (PON, SRSW, NIPD, etc.), city and county government (elected officials and staff), environmental groups, and businesses. The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality would also participate, and hopefully, at some point, Pall/Gelman.

An initial meeting took place with representation from many of the groups that will be involved with CARD. A number of persons volunteered, including Mike R. from PON, to work on a draft proposal for the group, a basic organizational chart and to construct a resolution (attached) to present to the Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners for consideration.

Funding and staff support from local governments will be sought to underwrite the group. A website will be maintained to educate newcomers to the issue and keep all notified of progress on the remediation (or lack thereof).

One of the main goals is to elicit participation and support from citizens, a group that many feel has been excluded/ignored from too much of the process in recent years. PON feels, like many others, that there must be citizen representation in all facets of this proposed organization.

The mission of the group stresses action, not merely advice, and will be comprised of policy, political, education and other arms. It is the intent to maintain information on the pollution and cleanup, educate the public, and be proactive regarding those issues with elected officials from the local level to the state, government agencies with jurisdiction over the cleanup and PLS.

CARD will have access to policymakers via elected officials who are members of this group and can in turn perhaps impact those decisions that affect the neighborhoods and the quality of life in Ann Arbor and the surrounding areas (i.e. Scio and Ann Arbor Twps.), that are and will be affected by 1,4 Dioxane and newly, Bromate pollution.

However, to adequately represent citizens’ interests in this group, participation and commitment is needed. Every committee and subcommittee will need citizen members. The work cannot be carried on only by the committed few that have done so for over a dozen years (Pat Ryan, Roger Rayle, et al.). Committees may only meet once a month or so, thus would not necessarily be a major time requirement. However, a little time spent will allow one to impact what will happen to our community in the short and long run and hopefully counteract the historical inertia that has plagued remediation efforts so far.

There is seemingly a remarkable amount of agreement between the people and groups that have been involved so far with the birth of CARD and it is definitely an opportunity to directly affect our quality of life, and the future of our homes and neighborhoods.

YOU ARE NEEDED!!! This is your chance to make a difference!!

The next organization meeting of CARD will be 6:30-8:30pm, Tuesday, February 21, 2006, at the Scio Township Hall, 827 N. Zeeb Rd (1/2 block North off I-94). The meeting will begin with a review of current issues, followed by assignment of committee and sub-committee actions. There will be an immediate opportunity to participate.

Thus far, a draft proposal of a resolution to present to the Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners has been developed and is attached.

PON is looking to secure a sense of potential turnout and would ask you to please consider contacting Mike Romatowski at mromatowski109791mi@comcast.net if you are interested in attending or if you have questions. Please pass this information along to your friends and neighbors.

Thank you,

www.ProtectOurNeighborhoods.com

Posted September 14, 2005

On Tuesday evening a public hearing was held within Scio Township to discuss a permit renewal that allows Pall Life Sciences to discharge treated water into the Honey Creek tributary. This treated water contains low levels of 1,4 dioxane and bromate. Although diluted, this water flows directly to the Huron Rriver upstream from Barton Pond where the city of Ann Arbor's municipal water intake is located. The health of the Huron River is critical to Ann Arbor, since it is the major source of drinking water for city residents and there are no locally available alternatives that could meet Ann Arbor water needs.

Pall Life Sciences has been discharging treated water into the Honey Creek tributary for several years. They are allowed to do so via a permit granting process overseen by the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality and the Michigan Department of Water Quality that requires them to meet specific cleanup criteria. In the past few years they have been very successful at removing the 1,4 dioxane from this water, however they have recently changed to a new treatment system. The new system results in two significant changes relative to the previous treatment system:

1) It is not as effective at removing 1,4 dioxane as the previous treatment system. Although the levels of 1,4 dioxane are still within the mandated maximums allowable, the quantity in the treated water using the new treatment system is typically two to three times as high as the levels achieved with the previous treatment system.

2) It involves the release of bromate, a by-product of the treatment process, that is a known carcinogen. Bromate is chemical substance which is even more dangerous than 1,4 dioxane. Modeling data indicate that the amount of bromate released, and the amount of bromate reaching the water intake at Barton Pond, will be lower than maximum allowable levels. However, given that the City of Ann Arbor's water treatment system already produces small amounts of bromate, and the unpredictable nature of surface water models, additional bromate in our water should be a significant concern to all Ann Arbor residents.

In sum, the new treatment system is clearly not as effective as the old system in eliminating 1,4 dioxane. Furthermore, it adds to the discharge small quantities of a known carcinogen--bromate--which does not break down in the environment. Pall is required by law to use the "best available technology" in their water treatment. The only improvement of the new system over the old one is that it costs less for the company to treat the water. The new system is clearly not the best available technology. They have utilized the old treatment system for several years, and, given their recent profitability, should be able to continue to do so.

In addition, Pall Life Sciences would like to stop using a "green pond" at their facility where treated water is held prior to being released into Honey Creek. The "green pond" is a safety mechanism which ensures that 1,4 dioxane contaminated water is not directly released into the creek. Should the treatment system fail, it is possible that thousands of gallons of 1,4 dioxane contaminated water could be released directly into the creek.

We should demand the best possible cleanup from our local, county and state government officials and that safety measures used to protect the local surface water, and ultimately Ann Arbor's drinking water, continue to be utilized. You can read details of the new permit here:
http://www.michigan.gov/deq/0,1607,7-135-3311_4109_9846_9847-73234--,00.html

You can submit a comment to Michigan's Department of Environmental Quality by e-mailing Alec Malvetis malvetia@michigan.gov before 5 p.m. on Friday September 16th. Feel free to write you own opinions or to copy the example statement below.

<Begin>

My name is ______________ and I live at _____________ in the City of Ann Arbor. I am writing to comment on the recently proposed changes to the permit that Pall Life Sciences uses to release 1,4dioxane treated water into the Honeycreek tributary. This tributary flows into the Huron river above the City of Ann Arbor's drinking water supply, thus this permit is of critical importance to the health of thousands of local residents.

I am specifically concerned about the recent changes made by Pall Life Sciences to the type of treatment system being used to remove 1,4 dioxane from the contaminated water. Recent data indicate that the new treatment system is less effective at removing 1,4 dioxane than the old system. Moreover, the new system also releases bromate, a known carcinogen, into the water. Pall Life Sciences is required to use the "best available technology" in their cleanup activities and it is clear that this new system is not the best available technology. Although the new permit attempts to keep the levels of both 1,4 dioxane and bromate within acceptable levels, any unnecessary increase in the quantity of these substances released into the surface water could potential affect the health of thousands of local residents. Common sense dictates that any new treatment system should be at least as effective at the old system, and should not release additional toxic substances into our water before it can be considered "best available technology".

In addition, I would like to see Pall Life Sciences continue to use the green pond at their facility as a safety device to ensure that untreated water is not released into the Honey Creek tributary. Eliminating the use of this green pond is a bad idea, since failure of the system could result in the release of thousands of gallons of untreated water directly into Honey Creek.
<end>

***********************************************************************

Since this involves permits and decisions made at the state level we would also encourage you to contact you state level representatives to indicate that you are unhappy with these changes that will allow the polluter to release additional chemicals into our drinking water supply. You can find their contact information on the protectournieghborhoods.com site here: http://www.protectourneighborhoods.com/getinvolved.html or use the links below.

Governor Jennifer Granholm: www.michigan.gov/gov (Click on “contact the governor”.)

Senator Carl Levin: senator@levin.senate.gov

Senator Debbie Stabenow: senator@stabenow.senate.gov (Link to contact page.)

Representative John Dingell: www.house.gov/dingell/contact.htm (Link to his site, please click "send an email message…".)

Senator Liz Brater: senlbrater@senate.michigan.gov

Representative Chris Kolb: chriskolb@house.mi.gov


Please feel free to forward this e-mail to other local residents who might wish to become involved in this important issue.

Posted September 11, 2005

On Tuesday, September 13, 2005, there will be a public meeting on the Pall/Gelman Discharge Permit for Honey Creek.

It will take place at 7:00 P.M. at the Scio Township Hall at 827 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor.

This meeting concerns the renewal of the permit for use of Honey Creek by PLS to discharge treated water (for dioxane). Issues include methodology of treatment, standards for levels of contamination, etc. For instance, a new methodology that has been used for the recent past results in overall higher levels of dioxane after treatment and the presence of another carcinogen (bromate). PLS will seek to use the new treatment because it is cheaper and dioxane levels, although higher, are still within guideline. There is much more complexity to this issue beyond this.

As it concerns the direction and nature of the treatment of the contamination and directly affects the E-plume under Ann Arbor and its neighborhoods, we urge all interested parties to attend this meeting.

Citizen oversight and input are necessary to keep the interests of the citizenry at the forefront of all policy decision-making. If we do not make our presence felt, decisions will be made without regard for our interests.

Links to the DEQ documents regarding the permit hearing...

Here is a link to the DEQ's Permits on Public Notice:
http://www.michigan.gov/deq/0,1607,7-135-3313_3682_3713-10463--,00.html

Scroll down and click on the Pall permit MI0048453 for 8/12/2005 to access related links or use the same links shown below.

Here is a link the the DEQ's public notice of the meeting:
http://www.deq.state.mi.us/documents/deq-water-npdes-publicnotice-MI0048453_PN.pdf

Here is a link the a 3-page Fact Sheet concerning the permit:
http://www.deq.state.mi.us/documents/deq-water-npdes-publicnotice-MI0048453_FS.pdf

Here is a link to the 1-page DEQ addendum concerning Rule 1098:
http://www.deq.state.mi.us/documents/deq-water-npdes-publicnotice-MI0048453_AD.pdf

Here is a link to the 20-page draft permit:
http://www.deq.state.mi.us/documents/deq-water-npdes-publicnotice-MI0048453.pdf

Here is a link to the 37-page Permit Application filed by Pall Life Sciences:
http://www.deq.state.mi.us/documents/deq-water-npdes-publicnotice-MI0048453_AP.pdf

Posted September 6, 2005

Report from the Washtenaw County Commissioners meeting, Aug 3,2005:

The Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners sought to pass a resolution in an effort to obtain better oversight in the Pall Life Sciences (PLS) deep ground water contamination. The county's original resolution was to ask the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) to appeal a recent court decision (May 17, 2005), which prescribed cleanup efforts and created a protective prohibition zone (drawn up by MDEQ) in residential areas.

Citizens rallied to oppose this resolution for several reasons. Because protracted legal proceedings, have in the past delayed cleanup activities, such an appeal would have been counterproductive. It was also a consensus that MDEQ would be unlikely to consider an appeal of a plan that they had, in fact, submitted to the court. In addition, were the request for an appeal granted and the appeal itself successful, the entire 1,4 dioxane issue would be back in the judiciary’s hands and pipelines in the neighborhoods would be back on the table.

County commissioners listened to citizens’ concerns and opened the discussion of the resolution up to citizens and local experts. Both sides worked on a revised resolution that is attached to this message and was passed unanimously by county commissioners on August 3rd. The accepted resolution (a request to seek to amend the court decision of May 17th, 2005 as opposed to an appeal) seeks specifically: additional oversight into the cleanup process; compensation for county services related to the maintenance of the prohibition zone; and protections against future clean ups that might fall within the current prohibition zone.

Ultimately, the county stated that they would like to see more aggressive cleanup activities at the core facilities where approximately 80 percent of the contamination resides, with the goal of greatly reducing the migration of 1,4 dioxane within the E aquifer under city residential neighborhoods.

County officials have voiced interest in reinvigorating an intergovernmental partnership program that would include local citizens and would produce a more coherent strategy for addressing the 1,4 dioxane problem. It is our expectation that the intergovernmental partnership would not only bring citizens and local government together, but establish clear accountability for and monitoring of further actions taken on this issue.

PON guardedly supports the revised resolution. We would note that county officials were willing to accept input from the citizenry to alter the original resolution. However, it should be noted that it was only through citizens that there was an awareness of and response to the undesirable original resolution. This might have led to disaster for the neighborhoods. Yet to be communicated is the date of submission of the revised resolution to MDEQ and the anticipated time frame of their response.

We will continue to update you as we become aware of future developments. Please invite friends and neighbors to join our e-mail list (send a message to protect@umich.edu). Citizens must stay involved in this process in order to continue to protect our neighborhoods.

protect@umich.edu is a moderated listserve. Messages sent to protect@umich.edu are not automatically forwarded to the list members. Please contact protect@umich.edu to be added or removed from our e-mail list, or if you would like to supply information related to the local neighborhoods and the Pall Life Sciences 1,4 dioxane cleanup.

Posted August 3, 2005

PON is providing an update on the upcoming resolution to be submitted to the Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners at their regular meeting on Aug 3 at 6:45 p.m at 220 N. Main in Ann Arbor.

At 5 p.m. on August 1, Jeff Irwin, Conan Smith and technical staff from Washtenaw County, including Dept. Director Richard Fleece met with a group of concerned residents, comprised of Jeff Hutsler, Mike Romatowski and others from PON, Pat Ryan, Roger Rayle, Glenn Thompson, Barb Schneider and others.

The main topic was the proposed Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners resolution requesting MDEQ appeal the May 17, 2005 decision by Judge Shelton regarding the establishment of a Prohibition Zone in Ann Arbor.

Sentiment ran strongly against the request for an appeal, due to the unsuccessful track record in the remediation of the dioxane, the definite potential for pipelines in the neighborhoods with a completely reopened decision and the county’s own acknowledgement that their request to MDEQ would not likely be successful. That assessment was based on the unlikelihood that MDEQ would appeal its own submission to the court regarding the Prohibition Zone.

After over two hours of discussion, it was deemed desirable to pursue reestablishing a Citizens’ Advisory Board to work in conjunction with the County in determining strategies going forward. One such area would be the upcoming renewal of the Honey Creek discharge permit.

County personnel conceded that a primary motivator for the proposed resolution was the need to “send a message” to the state and MDEQ. County personnel are finding their role in the administration of the Prohibition Zone frustrating, while being excluded from a role in the overall case against Pall.

Attached are the cover memo and the amended resolution. The amended resolution asks MDEQ to seek an amendment to the May 17, 2005 ruling by Judge Shelton, not an appeal. Its scope seems to be more specific and limited and does not appear to address or ask to undo the decision eliminating the leading edge component of the dioxane remediation.

PON intends to appear at the Board meeting on Aug 3rd to monitor the actual process.

If at all possible, PON RECOMMENDS ATTENDING THE MEETING to continue to illustrate the vigilance of the citizens to all those involved - including our elected representatives - to protect our neighborhoods, provide input and to monitor the process that continues to impact our homes and lives. The Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners will meet today, Aug 3 at 6:45 p.m at 220 N. Main in Ann Arbor.

Posted July 31, 2005

PON! ACTION ALERT: COUNTY IS ASKING MDEQ TO APPEAL JUDGE SHELTON’S RULINGS

******************************************************

Attached is an e-mail distributed by the County. It announces an meeting subsequent to the recent public meeting on July 20 regarding the Prohibition Zone established by MDEQ in accordance with the Washtenaw County Circuit Court decision of May 17, 2005.

This Prohibition Zone stops Pall Life Sciences from extracting 1,4 dioxane contaminated groundwater within our local residential neighborhoods, and seeks to limit future migration of 1,4 dioxane into residential areas. The upcoming meeting is intended to allow public input on a County resolution that would appeal the Prohibition Zone that currently protects us from industrial waste water extraction and treatment. The county will vote on this resolution on August 3rd, so the time to be heard is now.

Purpose of the Meeting: Review and discuss with local government officials the proposed Washtenaw County Board of Commissioner Resolution that asks the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) to appeal the recent court Opinion and Order regarding Pall Life Sciences (PLS) remedial actions.

Location: Lower Level Conference Room
220 North Main, Washtenaw County Administration Bldg.
Ann Arbor, MI
Date: August 1, 2005

Time: 5 pm

At the previous meeting, Richard Fleece, director of the Washtenaw County Department of Planning and Environment, led the county’s presentation with the outright declaration that the county would ask, via a Board of Commissioners resolution, that MDEQ appeal the May 17 decision. He asserted that county personnel feel that the allowable ppb of dioxane in the Prohibition Zone is too high and a more aggressive remediation is necessary and desirable.

A number of citizens made remarks and/or asked questions. There were a number of first-timers in attendance, and many seemed generally supportive of the county’s sentiment. However, it was also evident that many in attendance did not understand that the prohibition zone was established to protect the residential neighborhoods from exposure to industrial activities associated with 1,4 dioxane contaminated groundwater extraction, and to limit further migration of 1,4 dioxane into local west side neighborhoods. We support the need for aggressive extraction and treatment at the core facility, but oppose any measure that would threaten the neighborhood prohibition zone.
The implications of a successful appeal by MDEQ are far reaching and could affect the original 2004 decision that denied the use of the pipelines within our neighborhoods.

PON feels that a successful appeal of the decision(s) regarding the E-plume could potentially lead to pipelines being installed in the neighborhoods. Regardless of any official’s intent not to pursue this avenue, it would be on the table once again, if the decision(s) are reopened.

PON opposes the appeal of the May 17, 2005 and/or Dec 2004 decisions. Minimally, we favor a prohibition zone remaining in effect for all neighborhood areas.

PLEASE ATTEND THIS MEETING, IF AT ALL POSSIBLE, IN ORDER TO REMIND THE COUNTY ELECTED OFFICIALS OF THE ONGOING INTEREST IN THIS MATTER. A SIGNIFICANT PRESENCE IS IMPERATIVE.


We are concerned at the short notice and inconvenient time for a meeting meant to garner public input.

__________________
Original Meeting Announcement sent by Michael Gebhard on July 29, 2005 at 2:55 p.m.

Please attend a meeting to discuss the proposed Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners resolution dealing with the Pall Life Sciences (PALL) 1.4-dioxane contamination affecting our community. The proposed resolution will be considered at the August 3, 2005 meeting of the Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners.

Purpose: Review and discuss the proposed Washtenaw County Board of Commissioner Resolution requesting MDEQ appeal the recent court Opinion and Order regarding Pall Life Sciences (PALL) remedial action.

Location: Lower Level Conference Room (limited seating capacity – approximately 15 to 20)
220 North Main, Washtenaw County Administration Bldg.
Ann Arbor, MI
Date: August 1, 2005

Time: 5 pm

An additional opportunity to provide input regarding the proposed resolution will be available at the Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners Meeting scheduled for August 3, 2005, at 6:45 p.m. (Administration Building – Board Room, 220 N. Main Street Ann Arbor, Michigan)
Attached are copies of the proposed resolution and the courts order for your review.

Posted July 19, 2005

On Wednesday July 20, at Forsythe Middle School from 6-8 p.m., MDEQ will make a presentation regarding aspects of Judge Shelton’s decision on the Dioxane contamination.

The court decision created a “prohibition zone” where no groundwater may be removed from underneath Ann Arbor property- from Wagner Road east to the Huron River.

Besides the presentation, staff from MDEQ, Washtenaw County, and the City of Ann Arbor will be present to answer questions.

We strongly urge all interested parties to attend the meeting.

There are further developments at the county level and further action alerts will be forthcoming. It does not appear that the issues regarding Judge Shelton’s decision are over. Below is a memo indicating that the Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners will consider a resolution to ask MDEQ to appeal a May 17, 2005 decision rendered by a Washtenaw County Circuit Court subsequent to Judge Shelton’s decision regarding the Gelman Dioxane issue. This resolution is scheduled for the Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners’ meeting on Aug 6. This memo has obviously been sent to local, county and state politicians.

PON’s concern is that if the decision is successfully appealed, pipelines in our neighborhoods would again be on the table.

Again, PON strongly urges attendance at the July 20 meeting and the County Commissioners’ meeting on Aug 6, as well.


Memo regarding the resolution being submitted to the WCBoC:

From: Michael Gebhard [mailto:gebhardm@ewashtenaw.org]
Sent: Friday, July 01, 2005 2:34 PM
To: Michael Moran; Janice Skadsen; Mary Fales; Matthew Naud; Susan McCormick; Patty Benson; Kirk Riley; Janis Bobrin; Curtis Hedger; Jeff Irwin; Leon Moore; Conan Smith; Roger Rayle; Chris Kolb; Vivienne Armentrout; Fred Dindoffer; Sen. Liz Brater; Charles Nielsen; John Hansen; Ellen Clement; Fraser, Roger; Hieftje, John; L. Lemke; pambyrnes@house.mi.gov; almasmith@house.mi.gov; senbhammerstrom@senate.michigan.gov
Cc: Frank Cambria; Anthony VanDerworp
Subject: URL Link Correction - PLS/Gelman BOC Resolution for Consideration
To: Concerned Stakeholders
Date: July 1, 2005
From: Dick Fleece, Director
Michael Gebhard, Environmental Analyst
Environmental Division
Department of Planning and Environment
Washtenaw County

Re: July 6, Board of Commissioners Meeting

Because of your involvement and concern with this issue, we wanted to make you aware that the Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners will consider a resolution requesting the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality appeal a court ruling that put in place Institutional Controls to prevent exposure of 1,4-dioxane.

We are concerned that the effect of this order has not been fully understood by the public and sets a precedent that can have far-reaching consequences. Some of our concerns include the following:
* 1,4-dioxane is allowed to continue to spread easterly towards the Huron River at levels up to 2800 ppb. This level is higher than the heretofore standard of 85 ppb and much higher than the standard of 3.0 ppb which has been sought in the past
* 5500 properties in the Ann Arbor area are located within a “Prohibition Zone” that allows this contamination. We are advised this designation will be subject to disclosure requirements when the properties are being sold.
* This action is based on limited information and rejects other alternatives that have the potential to more effectively remove 1,4-dioxane from the groundwater.
* This action sets a precedent that has the potential of setting less stringent cleanup standards for contamination incidents, now and in the future.

To view the Board memorandum and resolution visit http://www.ewashtenaw.org/government/boc/agenda for the Board of Commissioners July 6, 2005 Agenda. Please share with others as you see fit.


This site shows the proposed resolution:

http://www.ewashtenaw.org/government/boc/agenda/bd/year_2005/2005-07-06bd/2005-07-06bd17.pdf


******************************************************************************

This site is the city’s information showing the map of the prohibition zone. This information is dated March 2005:

http://www.ci.ann-arbor.mi.us/CityAdministration/EnvironmentalCoordination/DEQ%20March%202005%20PZ%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf

Posted December 18, 2004

PON! ACTION ALERT: NO PIPELINE NETWORK-

From today’s Ann Arbor News.


"To say that the residents in the affected areas would be reluctant to agree to have pipelines containing 1,4 dioxane running through their neighborhoods is an understatement by several degrees of magnitude," Shelton wrote. "Public hearings have demonstrated overwhelming opposition to such a plan."

No pipeline network for Pall cleanup
Judge orders treatment facility in Maple Village area
Saturday, December 18, 2004
BY TRACY DAVIS
News Staff Reporter

Ann Arbor will not be getting a controversial network of pipes through west side neighborhoods as part of a plan to clean up contaminated groundwater, according to a Circuit Court order issued Friday.

The order, filed by Judge Donald Shelton, calls instead for a groundwater extraction, treatment and re-injection facility in the Maple Village Shopping Center area, coupled with an expansion of cleanup efforts already under way on Wagner Road.

The operation for cleaning up 1,4 dioxane, a man-made solvent classified as a possible carcinogen, will be housed in two construction-type trailers, said Farsad Fotouhi, vice president for corporate environmental engineering for Pall Corp., the company responsible for the cleanup.

The pipelines would have been installed under three to four miles of city streets, including several residential roads off Jackson Avenue. "Hallelujah!" said Worden Street resident Mary Haavisto, reacting to the decision. "It just seemed like it was going to disrupt the whole street." Resident concerns - including property values and public health - and logistics were factors Shelton pointed to. "To say that the residents in the affected areas would be reluctant to agree to have pipelines containing 1,4 dioxane running through their neighborhoods is an understatement by several degrees of magnitude," Shelton wrote. "Public hearings have demonstrated overwhelming opposition to such a plan."

He added that the city offered no commitment to facilitate installation of the pipeline. In the past, cleanup infrastructure has been a sore point between the city and Pall; the court had to intervene in the late 1990s over access issues for a pipeline from northwest Ann Arbor to Pall. Fotouhi credited the city for its cooperation in recent years, however.

The order appears to bring resolution to the most recent chapter of a decades-old pollution problem. The company's previous owner disposed of wastewater that contained 1,4 dioxane, used to manufacture medical filters, by storing it in unlined lagoons and spraying it over grounds from the mid-1960s through the mid-1980s, when it began turning up in wells and ponds in the area.

It has since migrated east. In 2001 it was discovered to have contaminated a low-lying aquifer - the "unit E" aquifer - into which a west-side city well is tapped. The well was taken off-line and the municipal water supply is not contaminated, according to city and DEQ officials.

But the contamination in that aquifer extends under dense neighborhoods around and east of Veteran's Park. The court intervened in the overall cleanup effort years ago because of friction and a series of lawsuits between DEQ and the company's then-owner. It has recently been monitoring proposals for how to get the contamination addressed quickly. Pall officials, who advocated for an on-site treatment at Maple Village, called the order a "very comprehensive remediation plan." Once an access agreement is in place on a public right-of-way or private property, the pump-treat-reinject operation should be under way within six months, Fotouhi said.
DEQ had advocated for the pipeline system, arguing it would be more effective at reaching larger areas of the plume faster.

DEQ project coordinator Sybil Kolon said Friday the organization did not have a position yet on the order, but that officials would meet on the issue early next week.
Shelton's order also directs that the aquifer be treated to 2,800 parts per billion of dioxane. The cleanup standard is normally 85 ppb in order to protect it as a drinking water resource, but the 2,800 is a permissible standard if steps are taken to ensure no one drinks the water, according to DEQ officials.
Those steps include a map of the contaminated zone with a buffer area, a prohibition against new water supply wells and groundwater consumption in that zone and a requirement that Pall pay for any connections to city water necessitated by the contamination.

Though no wells are believed to be affected by the contamination, there are township "islands" in the east-central part of the city near the river. The plume is believed to be headed toward the river.

And in the past, city and Ann Arbor Township officials have expressed concern that the plume could actually pass under the river and spread north into the township rather than emptying and diluting into the Huron. "We're at least pleased this is moving forward," said Ann Arbor Environmental Coordinator Matt Naud.
"We will remain vigilant as will the citizens who have been involved in this, in making sure every effort is made to stop the flow of this toward the city. A lot of the other pieces remain to be seen."

The water will be treated the same way it is at the company's Wagner Road facility - with ozone and small amounts of hydrogen peroxide. The next step is a work plan the company must file within 30 days, according to the order.


Thanks for everything everyone has done to make this happen! While we have some concerns, we are encouraged by the pipeline decision.

Happy holidays (!!!),

Jeff, Mike and Chris

The page link: http://www.protectourneighborhoods.com/getinvolved.html

protect@umich.edu is a moderated list. All emails sent to the protect@umich.edu address are reviewed prior to being forwarded to individual members. By responding to an email sent from this address, a response will only go to the moderator, not the entire list. One only needs to send an email with "subscribe" in the subject line to protect@umich.edu to be included. While we greatly appreciate involvement and participation by as many as possible, one may unsubscribe by sending an email to us with "unsubscribe" in the subject line.
Posted September, 2004 In speaking with a Washtenaw County Commissioner on Thursday Sept 16th, it was indicated it is imperative that as many people as possible send letters to State Senator Liz Brater and State Rep Chris Kolb supporting them in the fight against leading edge remediation in the neighborhoods. The commissioner believes that pressure on MDEQ may still have an effect, but that Ms. Brater and Mr. Kolb need concrete support in order to have an effect. They have worked to represent us, now we need to give them help.

Send an email to Sen. Brater and one to Rep. Kolb stating your position on the issue of leading edge remediation in the neighborhoods. Urge them to approach MDEQ and seek modification/elimination of this component of the MDEQ Remedial Proposal. (Contact information below or always available on the protectourneighborhoods.com website “Get Involved” page: http://www.protectourneighborhoods.com/getinvolved.html)

State Senator Liz Brater
Email: senlbrater@senate.michigan.gov

State Representative Chris Kolb
Email: chriskolb@house.mi.gov

Ask your neighbors, who are not on our list to call, email or write to them. Time is running out. We must pursue any avenue available to us; otherwise we will surely see pipelines in the neighborhoods very soon!

The page link: http://www.protectourneighborhoods.com/getinvolved.html

protect@umich.edu is a moderated list. All emails sent to the protect@umich.edu address are reviewed prior to being forwarded to individual members. By responding to an email sent from this address, a response will only go to the moderator, not the entire list. One only needs to send an email with "subscribe" in the subject line to protect@umich.edu to be included. While we greatly appreciate involvement and participation by as many as possible, one may unsubscribe by sending an email to us with "unsubscribe" in the subject line.
Posted October 31, 2004 PROTECT OUR NEIGHBORHOODS! ACTION ALERT - CITY COUNCIL WORK SESSION AND MAYORAL CANDIDATES’ POSITION STATEMENTS:

Dear Protect Our Neighborhoods! members,

We are forwarding position statements regarding the Gelman/PLS dioxane clean-up plans received from Ann Arbor Mayoral candidates incumbent John Hieftje and challenger Jane Lumm. We are also providing a brief recap of the City Council work session. We hope offering these in tandem may prove helpful in decision-making during this election period. (We are distributing this just a few hours after receiving the final position statement.)

Should you wish to contact the candidates personally:

John Hieftje: JHieftje@ci.ann-arbor.mi.us Telephone: 994-2766

Jane Lumm: janelummformayor@sbcglobal.net Telephone: (campaign office) 327-9981CITY COUNCIL WORK SESSION:This is an update to provide you with an overview of the recent City Council work session regarding the city of Ann Arbor’s formal stance toward cleanup activities within our residential neighborhoods.
Matt Naud, the city’s environmental coordinator, gave a slide presentation describing the current extent of the dioxane problem, as well as recent events that occurred in Judge Shelton’s court on September 8th. At this hearing Pall Life Sciences and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality presented their respective remediation plans for the larger clean up site, and, as we mentioned in a previous announcement, Judge Shelton announced his plan to amend the original court ordered cleanup after collecting additional input from PLS, the MDEQ, and the City of Ann Arbor.
Both Mike Romatowski (founding member of Protect Our Neighborhoods) and Pat Ryan, an environmental lawyer and local resident with a tremendous amount of knowledge regarding the current and historical aspects of the long-standing dioxane contamination, provided prepared statements to Mayor Hieftje and the city council at large. In short, both presented a compelling picture and summary of the concerns of the community and the residents within the so-called “leading edge” cleanup area located east of Maple Avenue.
The city has consistently stated that they intend to do everything that they can to protect the drinking water supply in Ann Arbor from dioxane contamination. In addition, the city has recently become very firm in their opposition toward dioxane extraction and pipelines within our residential neighborhoods and we believe that if they are allowed to influence the revised remediation plan, they would stay with this position. Mayor Hieftje was particularly clear on his opposition to dioxane extraction within residential areas during the work session meeting. There are, however, two issues that could restrict the city’s ability to maintain support for this publicly stated position:
1. The city currently has a pending lawsuit with PLS over the closure of the Northwest Supply Well on Montgomery Ave. Such a lawsuit could negatively impact the city’s resolve for protecting the neighborhoods depending upon which issue ultimately takes precedence in the upcoming legal proceedings.
2. Judge Shelton has not publicly indicated how influential, or formal, any input received from the city would be in his amended cleanup plans. In the past, Shelton has not allowed the city to formally enter into the case between PLS and the MDEQ, so his recent invitation to the city to provide input is a welcome change.
The meeting concluded with several members of the community voicing their opinions, support and concerns over the city’s role in the upcoming, court-mandated cleanup plan.

Sincerely,

Jeff


MAYORAL CANDIDATE POSITION STATEMENTS:


The following email was sent to both Mayoral candidates on behalf of Protect Our Neighborhoods!:

We are contacting you on behalf of the members of the Protect Our Neighborhoods! As you may know, we are a group of citizens aligned for the preservation and protection of the health and welfare of our neighborhoods and families, specifically as it relates to the PLS dioxane cleanup activities.

Prior to the Ann Arbor Mayoral election, and if you are so inclined, we would like to post your position on the issues affecting the neighborhoods in regard to the situation as well as it's impact on the residential neighborhoods.

We have received a number of communications expressing interest in the candidates’ positions and thought this the most efficient manner to accurately communicate your feelings and ideas.

To that end, we wondered if you would supply your position on the clean up and how it impacts the neighborhoods? Also, could you explain how you would support your position in action? What ideas, suggestions and plan-of-action would you propose to protect the neighborhoods?

Thank you so much for your time. We greatly appreciate your willingness to express your ideas and plans with our membership. We will distribute your response via email and, as mentioned, post it on our website.

Sincerely,

Chris O'Brien
Protect Our Neighborhoods!


RESPONSE from Mayor Hieftje:

Dear Mr. O'Brien

Although you already received it I am attaching a copy of the City's recent response to the court on this matter. I do this because on the advice of City Attorneys I am constrained from being specific about any action I might take that would go beyond what is discussed in the City's response to the court. As the chief executive official of the City I cannot at this time pledge to take specific action beyond what the City has already proposed. For example, I am not at liberty to say that in the event a "leading edge" strategy is endorsed by the court, the City would bring a lawsuit to stop that strategy from going forward. I mention this because it was suggested to me by a member of your group.
However, I believe my record of action on this issue and my long record as an environmentalist speaks for itself. As both a council member and Mayor I have supported a complete clean-up and I have voted to expend considerable city resources to fight this case and to engage on this issue. I have advocated our position at the highest levels of State Government, with both the head of the DEQ and with the Governor herself. I have worked in concert with City Council, our State Representatives and our State Senator to address this problem. It was in part due to my efforts and my solid working relationship with Congressman Dingell that the USGS was brought in to create a more accurate "map" of the aquifer.
My position on the "leading edge" strategy is well known and I have stated it publicly to the press. I reject the "leading edge" method as a strategy and will do whatever is necessary to protect our neighborhoods.

Thank you for writing.

John Hieftje


RESPONSE from Jane Lumm:

When I served on City Council, the decisions and votes I made on this 1,4 dioxane contamination problem were based on a simple principle -- what expectation would I have if this were occurring in my neighborhood. For that reason, I supported the establishment of Ann Arbor's 3 ppb guideline and the Best Available Technology principle. In an effort to get back up-to-speed, I've attended public and neighborhood meetings as well as the September 8th court hearing. After those meetings, I indicated on my website that I was opposed to leading edge remediation involving wells and pipelines in the neighborhoods. Having now reviewed the City's Memorandum to the court as well as other relevant materials, that position has not changed.

I agree with most of the key points contained in the City's Memorandum, including the City's general conclusions and recommendations -- that the PLS proposal is not acceptable, the MDEQ's determinations (that the contamination in the Unit E Plume must be extracted at Wagner Road and Maple Road) are appropriate, but that definitive decisions regarding leading edge remediation are premature.

I also agree with the City Memorandum's proposed timelines calling for installation of extraction wells quickly (in the next three to four months) at Wagner Road and near Maple Village. I support the recommendation that the court conduct quarterly status conferences (and that the City should participate in those conferences) and consider employing an expert scientific master to provide independent scientific opinions. In the meetings I attended, the need for an ongoing source of unbiased scientific data and assessments of alternatives was frequently expressed and that's a very legitimate and reasonable request.

Obviously I'm no scientist, but the logic of FIRST containing the high concentrations west of Maple Road seems compelling to me. As long as the source area is allowed to continue to feed areas both east and west, clean-up of Unit E will be more difficult. Once it's known how effective the new extraction wells are, then it can be better determined what leading edge actions (if any) are required. Plus, it seems clear that the migration pattern of Unit E isn't known at this point, so additional work (computer modeling, etc.) also would help determine what an appropriate leading edge strategy should be. Also, there is a question regarding how effective leading edge remediation is for areas as large as Unit E. All of these considerations point to a conclusion that defining a specific leading edge remediation strategy at this point would be premature.

In terms of the discharge strategy, there now seems to be a consensus that a pipeline to the Huron River is most appropriate. Given the concerns over continuing discharges into Honey Creek, the uncertainty regarding how successful re-injection has been, and limited sewer capacity among others, that conclusion certainly isn't unreasonable. The City recognizes this as well and in the Memorandum offers the use of city rights-of-way as long as the discharge is downstream of the City's water intake at Barton Pond. Although it very well may be, I am not familiar enough with all of the alternative solutions at this point to conclude this is the most cost-effective solution. If there is to be a pipeline, its path should follow the major streets and highways to minimize the disruption to neighborhoods.

One area where I readily admit I'm out of my league, is the appropriate treatment technique. I don't know which is most effective, but as I indicated earlier, I supported the Best Available Technology principle when I was on Council and that would continue to be my position.

I applaud the City for advocating on behalf of the neighbors' predominant views in its Memorandum to the court. There were concerns expressed by some neighbors, however, that in the past and more recently it wasn't always clear what city leadership's position was or that the neighborhood concerns and preferences were being reflected in the planning. Going forward, it is critical that there are ongoing forums (including scientific experts and resident stakeholders) to review neighbors' concerns and communicate any new developments including alternative solutions or potential scientific breakthroughs. Ultimately, the optimal solutions here will be ones that are developed by experts guided by the best science and ones that are reflective of neighborhood concerns.

As with any significant issue, open, two-way dialog is essential for a successful outcome. I certainly understand that it isn't always possible to solve problems to everyone's satisfaction, but on important issues such as this, as Mayor, I would:
- listen to and understand neighbors' and residents' concerns and positions; involve stakeholders in the processes as much as possible
- get answers to questions, ensure residents are provided all relevant information possible, and there's as much two-way dialog as is possible
- advocate on your behalf as strongly as I could
Respectfully submitted,

Jane Lumm
Candidate for Mayor of Ann Arbor


Thanks for helping to Protect Our Neighborhoods!,

Jeff, Chris & Mike

protect@umich.edu is a moderated list. All emails sent to the protect@umich.edu address are reviewed prior to being forwarded to individual members. By responding to an email sent from this address, a response will only go to the moderator, not the entire list. One only needs to send an email with "subscribe" in the subject line to protect@umich.edu to be included. While we greatly appreciate involvement and participation by as many as possible, one may unsubscribe by sending an email to us with "unsubscribe" in the subject line.

Posted September 12, 2004

PROTECT OUR NEIGHBORHOODS! ACTION ALERT-SUPPORT OUR REPRESENTATIVES

In speaking with a Washtenaw County Commissioner on Thursday Sept 16th, it was indicated it is imperative that as many people as possible send letters to State Senator Liz Brater and State Rep Chris Kolb supporting them in the fight against leading edge remediation in the neighborhoods. The commissioner believes that pressure on MDEQ may still have an effect, but that Ms. Brater and Mr. Kolb need concrete support in order to have an effect. They have worked to represent us, now we need to give them help.

Send an email to Sen. Brater and one to Rep. Kolb stating your position on the issue of leading edge remediation in the neighborhoods. Urge them to approach MDEQ and seek modification/elimination of this component of the MDEQ Remedial Proposal. (Contact information below or always available on the protectourneighborhoods.com website “Get Involved” page: http://www.protectourneighborhoods.com/getinvolved.html)

State Senator Liz Brater
Email: senlbrater@senate.michigan.gov

State Representative Chris Kolb
Email: chriskolb@house.mi.gov

Ask your neighbors, who are not on our list to call, email or write to them. Time is running out. We must pursue any avenue available to us; otherwise we will surely see pipelines in the neighborhoods very soon!

The page link: http://www.protectourneighborhoods.com/getinvolved.html

protect@umich.edu is a moderated list. All emails sent to the protect@umich.edu address are reviewed prior to being forwarded to individual members. By responding to an email sent from this address, a response will only go to the moderator, not the entire list. One only needs to send an email with "subscribe" in the subject line to protect@umich.edu to be included. While we greatly appreciate involvement and participation by as many as possible, one may unsubscribe by sending an email to us with "unsubscribe" in the subject line.

Posted September 12, 2004

PROTECT OUR NEIGHBORHOODS ACTION ALERT-CITY COUNCIL SESSION


The most recent update for the city council work session on the Pall-Gelman issue has been rescheduled as part of the city council meeting on Mon. September 27th, 6 p.m., in city council chambers. We urge any interested parties to attend.

The informal conference with Judge Shelton is scheduled for September 29th, and the city will be participating. The city will need as much input as possible to back its opposition to the leading edge remediation taking place in the neighborhoods. They will incorporate the input given at the meeting in their presentation to the judge.

This is probably our last opportunity and avenue for our voices to be heard by Judge Shelton, via the city.

Included below is a set of questions sent to Mayor Hieftje and his responses.

Dear Mayor Hieftje,

We wished to follow-up with you regarding the upcoming court decision by Judge Shelton in the Atty. General v. Pall Life Sciences case. We spoke with you, on Sept. 8, outside the courthouse and were encouraged by your strong position against leading-edge remediation taking place in the neighborhoods. You indicated that the city, township and county should coordinate a collective response to Judge Shelton's call for an informal conference 21 days from that date. We also discussed and agreed that the City Council work session rescheduled for the 27th of September was too close to the conference date to collect input from citizens and incorporate it in the information presented to the judge. 1) How will the response of the city, township and county be coordinated to maximize its impact with Judge Shelton?
2) What form do you envision the nature of that coordination of response will take?
3) How will resident input be taken and incorporated into that presentation?
4) How will you personally ensure that the positions of the local governments and the residents will be adequately and forcefully advocated before the judge?
5) Will the city appeal any decision by Judge Shelton that includes leading edge remediation in the neighborhoods?
6) Will the city work with Chris Kolb and Liz Brater to continue to press for change in this component with MDEQ? If so, how?
7) When will the city council session for the 27th be rescheduled for resident input?

We look forward to your response

Hello:
Council Members Woods, Easthope and I have discussed this with the City Attorney and his staff who are busy working with our outside attorneys and all of the staff involved in this effort. I have also discussed the City response with other members of Council. A lot of effort is going into crafting a strong document to present to Judge Shelton.
In regard to your questions:
1. At this point the attorney's believe that the Judge's call for input was directed solely to the city and did not include other governmental units. However, I have asked them to review this. In any event I have spoken about the concept of a combined response in another form that would be acceptable to the Judge with the Chair of the County Commission. I will be discussing this idea with the leadership of Scio Township on Saturday morning.
2. We are still working on this per above. It may or may not be acceptable to the Judge and we are waiting for a legal opinion.
3. The public meeting will still be held on the 27th and there will be time to incorporate comments into the City response which is due on the 29th. After checking calendars, this remained the best possible date for Council to assemble prior to the due date.
4. Along with Council, I will be providing direction to the legal team. I am strongly opposed to the "leading edge" strategy and I believe this opinion is shared by other members of Council.
5. The legal team is exploring this. As you may know, we have been trying to gain "standing" in this case for the last few years. In the past the City has not been been allowed "into" the case. It will be up to the courts as to if they would consider an appeal.
6. I am in regular contact with Senator Brater and Representative Kolb on this issue and they are both engaged in working with the DEQ.
7. As above, there will be adequate time to incorporate any new information presented at the meeting into the City response. Written material can and should be submitted prior to the 27th.
Thank you for writing.
John Hieftje

Again, we urge any interested parties to attend the city council meeting on Mon. Sept 27th, 6 p.m., in city council chambers (100 North Fifth Avenue)!

The page link: http://www.protectourneighborhoods.com/getinvolved.html

protect@umich.edu is a moderated list. All emails sent to the protect@umich.edu address are reviewed prior to being forwarded to individual members. By responding to an email sent from this address, a response will only go to the moderator, not the entire list. One only needs to send an email with "subscribe" in the subject line to protect@umich.edu to be included. While we greatly appreciate involvement and participation by as many as possible, one may unsubscribe by sending an email to us with "unsubscribe" in the subject line.

Posted September 12, 2004

Protect Our Neighborhoods Action Alert – “LAST CHANCE” TO BE HEARD!


We apologize for the length of the following information, however, we wanted to convey an overview of the Sept. 8th court review of the Pall-Gelman case before Judge Shelton.

It will be followed by a suggestion for action to be taken.
________________________________________________________________________

Ann Arbor Mayor John Hieftje, who attended the hearing, said he opposes the plan to drill wells and put pipelines in the residential neighborhoods. "It's something I believe is totally uncalled for and unfair at this point," Hieftje said.
--The Ann Arbor News, Thursday, September 9, 2004


Last week Protect Our Neighborhoods! sent an e-mail regarding Judge Shelton’s review of Dioxane E-Plume cleanup plans that may impact our neighborhoods. We have provided an overview of the hearing below.
In summary, the judge neither accepted, nor rejected any plan for cleanup of the E-plume, but did note that he felt time was running out. He indicated that he would impose a plan of action at a hearing that will occur in approximately 60 days. He also stipulated that within 21 days there would be an informal conference that will include input from Pall Life Sciences, the Department of Environmental Quality and the City of Ann Arbor.

In recent weeks local and state officials have heard from concerned citizens regarding their opposition to a premature cleanup plan within residential areas. For the most part, that message has been heard and most officials now realize that the health, safety and welfare of our neighborhoods depends on a well-thought-out and informed cleanup plan which attacks the mass of contamination west of Maple Road first. One of the few avenues that we have left to influence this process is through the city’s representation in both the informal conference (set to occur in a little over two weeks) and the ruling that Judge Shelton has promised to make within two months.

Court review of the Attorney General vs. Pall Life Sciences was held September 8th at 3 p.m. in Judge Donald Shelton’s courtroom. The first hour was spent with both sides and the judge in his chambers. At approximately 4 p.m. all emerged and settled down to the on-the-record review. Each side presented a short review of their positions in the case. Assistant Attorney General Robert Reichel reviewed the six conditions by which Pall Life Sciences could avoid the main MDEQ proposal. What common ground existed was covered. Pall then presented what they felt were their sincere efforts at cleanup of the problem. Judge Shelton summarized the relationship between the parties as at an impasse and that something would need to be done earlier than a year from now and would need to be judicially imposed, regardless of whether it would be appealed. Interestingly, both sides mentioned the resident’s concerns. The state basically inferred it was instigated by Pall and Pall noted that residents didn’t want a pipeline. Judge Shelton quickly dismissed comments on the flyer produced by a Pall employee and distributed in west-side neighborhoods before the July 28 public hearing as irrelevant.

As expected, Judge Shelton did not render a decision. Undoubtedly, he realized that more interested parties were present than were part of either side. However, his references to time and necessary judicial action lead us to believe he may impose a vigorous remediation. This will probably include action on the leading edge component. As the residents and the city are not parties to the suit, it is likely an appeal can only be made by either Pall or MDEQ. Our only avenue of input to the judge seems to be through the upcoming informal conference.City officials were not allowed to intervene as an interested party at this stage. Judge Shelton indicated he would rule within 60 days, but also would have an informal conference in 21 days. It seems the city may be able to participate in this phase. In speaking with Mayor Hieftje, who attended the hearing as well as Matt Naud and the city attorneys, he agreed that the city council working session scheduled for the 13th and subsequently moved to the 27th would be too close to the aforementioned informal conference. That work session may be rescheduled yet again, however, he did cite logistical concerns. He also advocated a coordinated response between the city, the township, and county to be presented at the informal hearing that would oppose leading edge remediation in the neighborhoods.

ACTION ALERT SUGGESTION

We strongly urge all interested parties to contact their council members, the mayor, county representatives and other political leaders to state their concerns on this issue. Contact information is available through the Protect Our Neighborhoods! website. (Link below.)

THE INFORMAL CONFERENCE MAY BE OUR LAST AND ONLY CHANCE TO VOICE RESIDENTS’ CONCERNS TO THE JUDGE VIA THE CITY’S PARTICIPATION IN THAT HEARING.

If you oppose leading edge remediation as premature, unnecessary and/or unproven, make your voice heard. While Pall may appeal any court decision containing this component, citizens need to ensure that local authorities will advocate on this matter. (Based on the following quote by Pall corporate vice president of environmental engineering Farsad Fotouhi, that appeared in The Ann Arbor News, it is not clear that they would consider an appeal. He stated that he was happy with Shelton's apparent readiness to make a decision. "In the past, we had a lot of difficulties in implementing any plan." He acknowledged that Shelton could order Pall to follow the DEQ's plan, but said that would be "better than what we have today.”) It appears that the city’s current position is against leading edge remediation. If you agree with this, give them your support. Don’t hesitate to encourage neighbors and friends to add their voice as well, by phone, or by email. They can join our email list on the website (see below).

Points to consider stressing in your communication:

*Opposition to leading edge remediation, either as premature, unnecessary, or unproven at this point.
*That the council work session currently scheduled for the 27th must be moved up to ensure citizen participation/support in the development of the city input at the upcoming informal hearing. That citing a “logistical issue” is not acceptable for failure to do so.
*Ask what that particular representative will personally do to ensure the position of the city and residents opposing leading edge remediation is passed on to the judge.
*Let the representative know the importance of this issue to you, and that you will hold them accountable for taking action on this and supporting the residents’ position.
*That if they follow through on the above, they will receive your support and thanks.

Contact information:

Email addresses for the Mayor and all City Council members may be accessed through the ”Get Involved” page of the Protect Our Neighborhoods! website under “Political Contact Info”. Please consider sending a letter to any and all of the leaders listed requesting their participation and support in this important, and possibly final, part of the process!

The page link: http://www.protectourneighborhoods.com/getinvolved.html

protect@umich.edu is a moderated list. All emails sent to the protect@umich.edu address are reviewed prior to being forwarded to individual members. By responding to an email sent from this address, a response will only go to the moderator, not the entire list. One only needs to send an email with "subscribe" in the subject line to protect@umich.edu to be included. While we greatly appreciate involvement and participation by as many as possible, one may unsubscribe by sending an email to us with "unsubscribe" in the subject line.

Posted September 5, 2004

Protect Our Neighborhoods! Action Alert – COURT REVIEW

Below is the court docket information for the review of the Pall and MDEQ remedial proposals before Judge Donald Shelton. We urge all interested parties to attend the hearing at 101 E. Huron (Washtenaw County Courthouse), Courtroom #9, 2nd floor. With a significant public turnout, the court will at least be aware of the intense public interest and concern with this issue.

MDEQ has released its proposal publicly. You can review the documents in this attachment. While it appears that if PLS can meet certain conditions, the need to remediate in the neighborhoods can be avoided, it is also evident that this scenario hinges upon PLS’s ability to meet those conditions. If PLS does not meet the conditions within the time allowed, it seems likely we could be back where we started with respect to leading edge remediation in the neighborhoods.

MDEQ has obviously been sensitive to the public’s and government officials’ responses. This is a positive sign, but it is also not a time for complacency. We will be at the courthouse on Wednesday to observe the proceedings. We hope you can be there, too.

Again, apathy is the enemy—involvement is the goal. This could be our final opportunity to show the courts the level of concern among the neighborhoods.

WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 8, 2004 3:00 P.M.
GCW-88-0034734 CE

KELLEY, FRANK J/ VS. GELMAN SCIENCES

REVIEW

FREEMAN,STEWART
REICHEL ROBERT

Posted August 26, 2004

Protect Our Neighborhoods! Action Alert

(Please note that although this email is lengthy, the Action Alert portion is only the first section. The balance includes information received from officials that might prove useful in assembling letters, including the attachment. We wanted to provide as much of the updated information and clarification we could obtain as possible. Our site has been completed and should be released by the end of the business day Friday!)

In a previous e-mail Protect Our Neighborhoods! urged neighbors to send a comment to the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), representatives and officials stating your position on Pall Life Science's (PLS) remediation plans to remove dioxane from within our residential neighborhoods. Thanks to all of you who contacted the DEQ as well as your state and local representatives. Your efforts have helped to give our neighborhoods a voice in the process and to raise awareness of this issue within the community. We have learned of numerous contacts made to officials from individuals as well as political leaders…how fantastic...and responses include letters from State Senator Liz Brater, City Council member Chris Easthope and Environmental Coordinator Matthew Naud (responses included below). In addition, concerns regarding the remediation plans and the plight of our neighborhoods have recently been featured in a front-page, headline article of The Ann Arbor News ("Pipeline Draws Protest" August 24, 2004)! People are listening, and we must continue to be heard especially with the hearing when Judge Shelton will rule on the specifics of the remediation plan that will be undertaken by the DEQ and PLS so close.

Protect Our Neighborhoods strongly encourages you to voice your personal opinion on the remediation plans within residential neighborhoods by writing a letter to the editor of The Ann Arbor News.

Individually authored letters can be submitted on-line at: http://www.annarbornews.com/letters.html

However, if more than one signer is included on a letter (with a maximum of two), it must be sent directly to the following email address with the name, address and phone number of each signer included: letters@annarbornews.com

Here are a few points to consider when constructing a letter:

*The maximum limit of words is 250.

*Please consider specifically referencing the September 8 hearing with Judge Shelton.

*As with all letters and emails, please personalize your submission as much as possible.

*Please look over the information we are including that has been received from public officials (below) and if you are encouraged, reference and/or use it if you feel it would help reinforce your position. Having these officials on our side helps and also lets those who are committing to assistance know that we appreciate their support and involvement.

*Please submit your letters as quickly as possible. We were told that the timeline to run submissions ranges from a few days to two weeks and that the paper attempts to run as many submissions as possible.The decisions made on September 8th may impact remediation efforts within our neighborhoods for years to come…please write a letter for The Ann Arbor News today!

Take advantage of the momentum!

If someone you know would like to be added to our mailing list, please have them let us know by sending an email to protect@umich.edu. While we greatly appreciate involvement and participation by as many as possible, one may unsubscribe by sending an email to us with "unsubscribe" in the subject line.

Protect Our Neighborhoods! is not aligned with any group, agency or organization to the exclusion of others. While we feel that our goal and position may work in concert with others, we do not attempt to speak for or represent any position and/or goal other than our own as listed in the Protect Our Neighborhoods! position statement.

_______________________________________________________________________

Below are responses and information that we received and clarifications we have worked to obtain since the last ACTION ALERT. Please look it over and if you are encouraged by what you read, contact the official who generated the information and thank them for their commitment to our neighborhoods and their continued support and involvement!

We are including a fairly lengthy document, which is the City of Ann Arbor’s Administrator’s comment to the MDEQ (this appears as an attachment in this email). We also have some clarifying responses from Matt Naud of the former on some questions. As noted above, we’re including responses we’ve received from City Council Member Chris Easthope and State Senator Liz Brater, as well.

(The transcript of the public meeting on July 28th held by MDEQ that evaluated the proposed remedial alternatives and MDEQ’s preferred alternative is available at:
http://www.deq.state.mi.us/documents/deq-rrd-GS-DEQJuly2004PublicHearing.pdf)
.
_______________________________________________________________________

From Liz Brater:

Thank you for contacting my office regarding the 1,4 dioxane contamination issue.

I agree with you that it is not prudent to suggest placing an extraction well in a residential neighborhood. Other options exist and should be pursued. I have communicated this concern on your behalf to the Department of Environmental Quality.

I will continue to work hard to seek a full and comprehensive cleanup of the 1,4 dioxane pollution in the Ann Arbor area. I apologize that previous travel plans prevented my attendance at some of the public meetings and hearings over the last few weeks, but I will be happy to meet with the neighborhood to hear your concerns.

Thank you again for letting me know your concerns about this important issue.


From Chris Easthope:

Mike 's questions:
"Did you comment to MDEQ, and if so, will you share that? A couple of questions for you, again. The City Council Work Session is scheduled for Sept 13th, after the court hearing date. Will impact opportunities be lost with that date? Can you briefly describe how citizens can participate in that situation? What is time and place for this meeting?"

1. No. I relayed my comments to Matt before his final submission. I believe that leading edge extraction is way premature as is any discussion regarding pipelines/extraction in Westside neighborhoods until and if there is demonstrated removal near the source.

2 The 13th is the first available work session date. Many people are gone for the remainder of August. The 13th is good in the sense that staff can update council on the outcome of the hearing on the 8th and give an overall update as well as answer all questions council lmembers may have.

3 I think that if the citizen group that has been formed has one designated speaker that can be called on, that would help. The work session is not a public hearing that will provide for open public comment, but some interaction should be expected.

4. Sept 13th, 7:00 pm - at the Detroit Edison building on Main. There will also be other issues discussed that evening as we have a full agenda. Be sure to check when date gets closer in case there are any changes. If you believe that a large amount of people would attend, please let me know, as that space may not be sufficient, and as such, we may have to find an alternate time/space to update council.

Chris Easthope
________________________________________________________________________

From Matt Naud (first communication) ((this cross references with the attachment to this email as well--PON))

The city stands by the original statement in the first set of comments (see paragraph below)

The city is supporting better science and modeling on the site, that would lead to more extraction at the core and area between the PLS facility and Maple Road (the model will assist in determining locations for monitoring and extraction), treatment away from residential areas, discharge downstream of the city water intake (which may include reinjection) and if the plume is demonstrated to be captured and extraction is deemed necessary east of maple road to limit any pipelines to major thoroughfares. Cleary I have no idea what will be the appropriate strategy until we find out what effect extraction at the core has had. Depending on how long things take I also have no idea where the plume will be (this is also affected by the MDEQ setting a 35ppb MCL that would expand the cleanup area) Regarding the public engagement I can't unilaterally provide changes to state law and provide you with legally defined clout - the best we can do is use the legal and other clout we have and ask DEQ to provide as many opportunities for input as possible. I believe the three public meetings have been influential and effective in shaping the strategy MDEQ will propose. We shall see on the 1st when they share their proposal and on the 8th when their attorney brings it forward to the court.

Again, thanks for being involved, it has been helpful in voicing concerns for the neighborhood and I hope MDEQ hears why I have heard. (para from previous comments) Again, if Ann Arbor's proposed modifications are adopted, the City believes that those concerns may be satisfactorily addressed as follows. First, Ann Arbor will provide access for both purge well locations and transmission pipelines from those locations to the treatment facility through its City street rights-of-way on major thoroughfares. Subject to confirmation, Ann Arbor believesthat appropriate purge locations can be identified along the major streets such as Jackson Road, Dexter Road and the like. By using those locations, there will be no need to take drill rigs within residential neighborhoods, themselves, or to disrupt and cause concern for residents in their neighborhoods. Second, it should be noted that Ann Arbor regularly installs pipelines through major thoroughfares such as the mentioned roadways. This can be done with minimal disruption of traffic and neighborhoods, through use of directional drilling and installation of the pipeline.
________________________________________________________________________

Clarification (second communication)
In talking with Mike there is some confusion about pairing two sets of comments together (Current comments to MDEQ from Matt Naud dated 8/16/04 and Roger Frasier, City Administrator and Matt Naud’s comments to MDEQ dated 3/16/04)
The Original comments in March responded to the Pall FS and "do nothing" approach
Our march comments reflect the need for Pall to actually clean the aquifer from the core to the leading edge and minimize any neighborhood disruptions
I believe that the most recent comments amend those comments to say that

1 - leading edge extraction should not occur until capture is demonstrated at Wagner and somewhere between there and Maple Road

2 - if leading edge extraction is necessary - MDEQ needs to have a process to engage the neighborhood and - as we have always asked of Pall in my tenure here-site infrastructure out of neighborhoods as much as possible

Hope this helps
Matthew Naud
Environmental Coordinator


Posted
August 13
2004

Dear Neighbors

This is the first ACTION ALERT from PROTECT OUR NEIGHBORHOODS! The deadline for public comment to MDEQ is Mon., August 16. Time is short for the MDEQ public comment period, although unofficial comments will be accepted beyond August 16. Based on our position statement, we are most concerned with the portion of the remedial proposal that deals with the supposed “Leading Edge” cleanup that will occur within our neighborhoods and how it will impact the health, safety and welfare of the families and residents of Ann Arbor. We hope you will submit your comments to MDEQ and also send a copy to the political representatives listed. (Contact information provided for each, so one can click on the email address/link and then copy/paste the letter for each.) Change may be effected only through the cumulative voice of many individuals.

Should it prove to be of assistance, or help save time, we are supplying a sample response comment below that is focused on opposing any remedial actions within residential areas that do not guarantee the health, safety and welfare of our neighborhoods. Please feel free to cut and paste the text below in your comments/letter if it would prove helpful. If it is used as the body of your letter, please add an introductory paragraph that is personalized with your background, story, etc. In any case, we hope you utilize the contact information to forward your comments to your representatives. (We are developing our site and working to include a one-click option to email many representatives at once!)

If others in your household have separate email accounts, please consider asking them to submit their individual comments as well...more voices are imperative! We currently have over 150 citizen contacts on our list and are working aggressively to increase the number. Please consider forwarding this information to your family members, friends and neighbors. Interested neighbors simply need to email protect@umich.edu to be added to the mailing list.



---------------------------------------------------cut-----------------------------------------------------
To Whom it May Concern,

(PERSONALIZE WITH YOUR INFORMATION)

My primary goal is to ensure that any remedial alternative instituted in our neighborhoods is maximally safe, effective and beneficial to all residents. I believe it is unreasonable and unacceptable to expect the residential neighborhoods to bear the burden and risks for a problem that has been allowed to proliferate over the course of several decades. I wish to state my strong opposition to the leading edge component (pipeline and well network) in the MDEQ proposal for the Remediation of the E-Plume of the Pall/Gelman Dioxane Contamination for the following reasons:

1) Pumping a known carcinogen with potentially harmful reproductive effects from deep underground to within a few feet of the surface within a residential area is hazardous to the health and welfare of our families.
2) I am not convinced that the integrity of the pipeline system that would carry this carcinogen could be adequately guaranteed (i.e. leaks, breakdowns, etc).
3) The scientific basis for “leading edge” remediation is questionable, especially within a highly populated residential area.
4) Similar “leading edge” solutions already utilized in the Evergreen neighborhood have been largely ineffective.
5) It does not make sense to extract dioxane within neighborhoods that are distant from the original site of contamination when the core areas and adjacent regions have not been successfully addressed.
6) I categorically oppose the loss of private property owners’ rights as part of any remedial alternative.

Sincerely,

(Your name)


--------------------------------------------------------cut------------------------------------------------

Email contact information. (Some are currently on recess, but your emails will help!)

MDEQ: kolons@michigan.gov
Governor Jennifer Granholm: www.michigan.gov/gov (Click on “contact the governor”)
Attorney General Mike Cox: miag@michigan.gov
Senator Carl Levin: senator@levin.senate.gov
Senator Debbie Stabenow: senator@stabenow.senate.gov (Link to contact page)
Representative John Dingell: www.house.gov/dingell/contact.htm
(Link to his site, please click "send an email message…" once there)
Senator Liz Brater: senlbrater@senate.michigan.gov
Representative Chris Kolb: chriskolb@house.mi.gov
Mayor John Hieftje: JHieftje@ci.ann-arbor.mi.us
City Council Member Christopher Easthope: CEasthope@ci.ann-arbor.mi.us
City Council Member Wendy Ann Woods: WWoods@ci.ann-arbor.mi.us
To e-mail Mayor and all members of council, use this link: E-Mail Mayor and Council

(Please let us know if you experience any difficulties with the listed links/addresses.)Thank you for your support of our families and neighborhoods! Another new campaign next week!

Jeff, Chris & Mike
PROTECT OUR NEIGHBORHOODS! is not associated with Pall Life Sciences, Inc, The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality or any other agency or group.
protect@umich.edu is a moderated list. All emails sent to the protect@umich.edu address are reviewed prior to being forwarded to the individual members. We greatly appreciate your involvement, but one may unsubscribe by simply sending an email to protect@umich.edu with "unsubscribe" in the subject line.

Posted
August 12
2004


Dear neighbors,

Welcome to the inaugural email of PROTECT OUR NEIGHBORHOODS!

We are a group of local residents who intend to pursue an active and aggressive agenda to inform the community, agencies and political leaders of the position of our neighborhoods regarding PLS/Gelman dioxane contamination and remediation, specifically the “leading edge”. We will work to build an extensive contact list and hold those contacted accountable for their support (or lack thereof).

Plans for this activism include activity in a variety of areas. Our next email will provide an “ACTION ALERT” base letter that can be used to comment to MDEQ during the public comment period concluding this Monday, August 16. As with all “ACTION ALERT” emails distributed, we will focus on a coordinated response and provide extensive contact information for groups, agencies, political leaders and media. PROTECT OUR NEIGHBORHOODS! will work to personally connect with political leaders, as has begun, and seek their involvement and support as well. A website is underway.

We believe that our position statement addresses a common concern and works in concert with many of the ideas and goals we have heard and experienced within the community.

PROTECT OUR NEIGHBORHOODS! POSITION STATEMENT

PROTECT OUR NEIGHBORHOODS! is a group of local residents within the neighborhoods that will be affected by the current clean-up plans. We are a political activist group dedicated to the preservation and protection of the health and welfare of our neighborhoods and families. Our primary goal is to ensure that any remedial alternative instituted in our neighborhoods is maximally safe, effective and beneficial to all residents. We believe it is unreasonable and unacceptable to expect the residential neighborhoods to bear the burden and risks for a problem that has been allowed to proliferate over the course of several decades. We currently oppose the MDEQ-proposed leading edge pipeline and well network because:1) Pumping a known carcinogen from deep underground to within a few feet of the surface within a residential area is hazardous to the health and welfare of our families.
2) We are not convinced that the integrity of the pipeline system that would carry this carcinogen could be adequately guaranteed (i.e. leaks, breakdowns, damage due to road/sewer work etc).
3) The scientific basis for “leading edge” remediation is questionable, especially within a highly populated residential area.
4) Similar “leading edge” solutions already utilized in the Evergreen neighborhood have been largely ineffective.
5) It does not make sense to extract dioxane within neighborhoods that are distant from the original site of contamination when the core areas and adjacent regions have not been successfully addressed.
6) We categorically oppose the loss of private property owners’ rights as part of any remedial alternative.

We will make every attempt to send emails containing specific information when most necessary and useful. Obviously, contact will be made more frequently within the next few weeks

Please consider forwarding this information to your family members, friends and neighbors. One of our goals, as stated above, is to create an extensive contact list as quickly as possible. Interested neighbors simply need to email protect@umich.edu to be added to the mailing list. We will provide an update on the success of this campaign to you within the next few days.

Thank you for your support of our families and neighborhoods!
Jeff Hutsler
Chris O’Brien
Mike Romatowski

PROTECT OUR NEIGHBORHOODS! is not associated with Pall Life Sciences, Inc, The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality or any other agency or group.

protect@umich.edu is a moderated list. All emails sent to the protect@umich.edu address are reviewed prior to being forwarded to the individual members. We greatly appreciate your involvement, but one may unsubscribe by simply sending an email to protect@umich.edu with "unsubscribe" in the subject line.


Signup for Action Alerts here.

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Protect Our Neighborhoods! is not aligned with any group, agency or organization to the exclusion of others. While we feel that our goal and position may work in concert with others, we do not attempt to speak for or represent any position and/or goal other than our own as listed in the Protect Our Neighborhoods! position statement
.